Daniel Darling, author, pastor, speaker

We Should Expect Non-Christians to Share Our Morals

A common reaction among evangelicals to the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage has been deflection from controversy. This laissez-faire approach has been most commonly expressed by closely connected beliefs about Christianity and morality: We should not expect non-Christians to think and live like Christians. So why all the fuss among Christians over the legalization of same-sex marriage? Since when do we depend on the government to enforce Christian morals? Many who express these sentiments do so with well-meaning attempts to (rightly) keep evangelicals from panicking over misplaced trust in temporal earthly powers. Additionally, they want to remind themselves and fellow believers that to be a Christ follower will always be, as Jesus promised, countercultural. Yet the two statements above reflect a poor understanding of how God ordered creation, morality, and the purpose he has given civil law. Assumptions like those above can lead to disastrous consequences for how we understand moral...

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The Way Home: Alastair Roberts and Andrew Wilson on salvation and restoration

The events in the book of Exodus stand as a pivotal moment in the Old Testament. Alastair Roberts and Andrew Wilson join the podcast to discuss the recurring theme of the exodus, salvation, and restoration throughout Scripture. Alastair Roberts completed doctoral studies at the University of Durham. He participates in the Mere Fidelity podcast and is a contributing editor for Political Theology Today. Andrew Wilson is teaching pastor at King's Church London. He is a columnist for Christianity Today. [powerpress] Show Notes Website: alastairadversaria.com and thinktheology.co.uk/blog Twitter: @AJWTheology and @zugzwanged Book: Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture ...

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7 Times Your ‘Righteous’ Anger Probably Isn’t

When pastors get angry, things can get complicated. On the one hand, we know that anger is not always an indication of sin. After all, we say to ourselves, Jesus got angry. Paul also counseled the Ephesians on anger, saying, “In your anger do not sin” (Eph. 4:26): implying that anger is inevitable in human relationships, and that there is a way to be angry and not sin. James further cautions his readers to be “slow to become angry,” encouraging a slow emotional response, but not forbidding one outright (James 1:19). All of this seems to suggest that it’s okay to be angry sometimes. What I have found in my own life, however, is that my attempts to justify anger—to point to Jesus whipping folks in the temple as a precedent for outbursts of righteous indignation—are typically ill-motivated, and they usually just end in me being an unbearable jerk. So how can...

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The Way Home: Jason Romano on forgiveness and redemption

He worked a dream job for Mike and Mike at ESPN for 18 years. But God stirred in his heart a new passion to share his own story, of forgiveness, of living with an alcoholic father, and of redemption. [powerpress] Show Notes Website: jasonromano.com and sportsspectrum.com Twitter: @JasonRomano and @Sports_Spectrum Book: Live to Forgive: Moving Forward When Those We Love Hurt Us ...

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