Daniel Darling, author, pastor, speaker / Posts tagged "suffering"

Friday Five: Aaron Armstrong

Today I’m happy to feature an interview with my good friend, Aaron Armstrong, who blogs at Blogging Theologically. This a blog I subscribe to and thoroughly enjoy as Aaron features a breadth of theological content.

Besides blogging, Aaron is an itinerant preacher, and a writer for an international Christian ministry focused on caring for the needs of the poor. His work has appeared on The Gospel Coalition’s “Voices” blog and RelevantMagazine.com’s “Deeper Walk” column. Aaron, his wife Emily, and their children worship and serve at Harvest Bible Chapel in London, Ontario..

Today I want to talk to Aaron about his new book, Awaiting a Savior, which rightly identifies the root cause of so much suffering in the world and how this truth informs our efforts to alleviate it. I had the privilege of reviewing the manuscript and writing an endorsement:

“In our highly activist, solutions-oriented generation, we easily think that we ourselves are the solution to the world’s social ills, particularly poverty. But the problem of poverty is the problem of sin and its solution lies in the heart of the Gospel. Aaron Armstrong brilliantly brings us back to Genesis and delivers a theologically robust vision for obeying the Scriptures’ command to help the poor while living in anxious anticipation of Christ’s coming Kingdom.”

Here is today’s Friday Five with Aaron Armstrong:

Resetting our Gratitude Meter

Though the fig tree should not blossom,
nor fruit be on the vines,
the produce of the olive fail
and the fields yield no food,
the flock be cut off from the fold
and there be no herd in the stalls,
yet I will rejoice in the LORD;
I will take joy in the God of my salvation.

Habakkuk 3:17-18

What are you thankful for? We gather, every year at this time, to reflect on the blessings of God over the past year. But in most families, Thanksgiving is less about real gratitude and me about stuffing your face, watching football, and hanging with the family. Some actually dread Thanksgiving, because they’re forced to sit in a room with people they really don’t enjoy.
Now I’m all in favor of the food and the football. But this year, let’s make Thanksgiving about giving and about thanks. This year, more than any, might force us to dig deeper. For many, it will mark a year since they’ve had employment .For others, Thanksgiving will bring another reminder that they haven’t found that significant other. And there are those couples who have to face the family questions of why they still can’t have children.
For many, 2010 was a year marked by pain. So how do we summon the gratitude?